Thursday, November 30, 2006

Business Etiquette For The Holidays

Holiday cheer comes once a year, but good impressions can last a lifetime.

This festive time of year offers no shortage of opportunities to network, celebrate with colleagues, and show your appreciation to clients with holiday cards and gifts. Yet with all of these cheery occasions comes the potential for etiquette mishaps. Here, manners experts and real estate pros answer some common questions and provide tips that will help you make a great impression this holiday season (though it's geared for real estate agents, is also has practical application in any business situation).
(Source: Realtor Online)

Click here for full details about business etiquett for the holidays.




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LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Federal Reserve Beige Book November 2006 Report

Most Federal Reserve Districts reported continued moderate growth since the last report. However, New York and Richmond observed that growth accelerated, whereas Dallas said the pace of activity continued to decelerate from high levels, and Atlanta described activity as mixed.

Despite continuing softness in automobile and housing-related sales, most Districts reported that consumer spending increased during October and early November, and the retail sales outlook for the holiday season was cautiously optimistic. According to most reports, growth in other service-producing industries remained generally solid. Manufacturing activity was positive overall, with the weakest reports concentrated among auto and housing-related producers. Reports on housing markets continued to indicate an overall decline in single-family home sales, and there were some reports of lower home prices. Indicators of single-family construction continued to weaken in most Districts. However, housing demand continued to be strong in a few specific markets, and nonresidential activity generally improved. Many Districts noted a continued slowing in mortgage lending, while reports on other lending were mixed. Some Districts reported a slight increase in delinquencies.

A number of Districts continued to report that labor markets were tight, especially for high-skilled occupations. Wage growth remained generally moderate, although some Districts gave accounts of stronger wage pressures for some specialized professions. Most Districts reported that prices moderated for construction materials and energy products.


In the Philadelphia (Third District) region, economic conditions improved slightly in November. Manufacturers posted small increases in shipments, but there were also marginal declines in new orders. Retail sales of general merchandise rose. However, auto sales did not increase. Bank lending increased overall, although not strongly, but mortgage lending declined. Residential real estate activity continued to decrease; by contrast, commercial real estate markets tightened further.

Third District business contacts generally expect business activity to continue to expand, but at a slow pace; however, they anticipate further softening in residential real estate. Manufacturers expect some improvement during the winter. Retailers are forecasting increased sales for the upcoming holiday season compared to a year ago. Auto dealers do not expect sales to pick up in the near future. Bankers anticipate slight gains in business and consumer lending but a further decline in mortgage lending. Residential real estate agents and builders expect further slowing in home sales through the winter. Contacts in commercial real estate expect demand for office and industrial space to remain strong.

Source Beige Book


Click here for the full Federal Reserve November 2006 Beige Book [Beige Book Archives]


See related blog articles:
Federal Reserve Beige Book For Economic Conditions (What is the "Beige Book"?)

The Federal Reserve - Making Sense In Plain English




Visit my web site for additional resources and services: www.LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit
BestHomes-NJ.com for the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (residential, commercial, multi-family, farm, land)

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Attitudes Against Land-Use Development Grow Deeper and Widespread In U.S., Survey Reveals

Negative mind-set dominates results of second national Saint Index© across 14 industries and five regions; citizens turn thumbs-down on effectiveness of local officials in land-use issues.

For the second consecutive year, the Saint Index©, a survey commissioned by
The Saint Consulting Group - an analyst of U.S. land-use politics, finds that Americans are strongly opposed to real estate development projects. In fact, twice as many continue to actively oppose development as support it...

Further, 70% of Americans support using tax dollars to keep land undeveloped, and 38% feel that “strongly.” And, according to the just-completed survey, Americans are less concerned about the environment [11 % response] than they are about protection of property values [36%] and preservation of community character [29%].

Click here for summary of survey




Visit my web site for additional services and support: LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Existing Home Sales Rise in October, Market Stabilizing

WASHINGTON, November 28, 2006 - Sales of existing homes held steady with a modest gain last month, another indicator that the housing market is transitioning into a more normal market in contrast with unsustainable activity last year, according to the National Association of Realtors® (NAR).

Total existing-home sales – including single-family, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops – rose 0.5 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate1 of 6.24 million units in October from an upwardly revised pace of 6.21 million in September, but were 11.5 percent below the 7.05 million-unit level in October 2005.

David Lereah, NAR’s chief economist, said market fundamentals are improving. “The present level of home sales demonstrates some confidence in the market, but sales are lower than sustainable due to psychological factors,” he said. “The demographics of our growing population, historically low and declining mortgage interest rates, and healthy job creation mean the wherewithal is there to buy homes in most of the country, but many buyers remain on the sidelines. After a period of price adjustment, we’ll see more confidence in the market and a lift to home sales should be apparent in the first quarter of 2007.”

According to
Freddie Mac, the national average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage was 6.36 percent in October, down from 6.40 percent in September; the rate was 6.07 percent in October 2005. Last week, Freddie Mac reported the 30-year rate dropped to 6.18 percent – the lowest since January of this year.

NAR President Pat Vredevoogd Combs, from Grand Rapids, Mich., and vice president of Coldwell Banker-AJS-Schmidt, said sellers in most of the country are doing what it takes to attract buyers. “With the exception of parts of the West, sellers are cutting their price enough to encourage sales,” said Combs. “It’s an especially good market for sellers in areas with rising jobs and a growing population where prices remain moderate – those are the areas now with the strongest price growth. On the opposite extremes, about 10 percent of the country is experiencing economic weakness, and a fourth of the nation – areas that had the biggest boom – is in a correction that will take longer to balance. All of that is working to the advantage of buyers in today’s market.”

The national median existing-home price2 for all housing types was $221,000 in October, which is 3.5 percent below October 2005 when the median price spiked above adjacent months to $229,000. The median is a typical market price where half of the homes sold for more and half sold for less.

“The annual decline in the October median home price is skewed because there was an uncharacteristic spike in October 2005, but the trend for the fourth quarter will be prices remaining slightly below a year ago. Overall prices are projected to see modest appreciation around early spring,” Lereah said.

Total housing inventory levels increased 1.9 percent at the end of October to 3.85 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 7.4-month supply at the current sales pace.

Single-family home sales rose 1.3 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.50 million in October from a level of 5.43 million September, but were 11.0 percent below the 6.18 million-unit pace in October 2005. The median existing single-family home price was $221,300 in October, which is 3.4 percent below a year ago.

Existing condominium and cooperative housing sales fell 4.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 741,000 units in October from an upwardly revised 778,000 in September, and were 14.5 percent lower than the 867,000-unit level in October 2005. The median existing condo price3 was $214,300 in October, which is 5.3 percent lower than a year earlier.

Regionally, existing-home sales in the Northeast declined 2.9 percent to a level of 1.01 million in October, and were 9.8 percent below October 2005. The median existing-home price in the Northeast was $254,000, down 5.2 percent from a year earlier.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

# # #

(See note 1 below)
The annual rate for a particular month represents what the total number of actual sales for a year would be if the relative pace for that month were maintained for 12 consecutive months. Seasonally adjusted annual rates are used in reporting monthly data to factor out seasonal variations in resale activity. For example, home sales volume is normally higher in the summer than in the winter, primarily because of differences in the weather and family buying patterns.

Existing-home sales, which include single-family, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, are based on transaction closings. This differs from the U.S. Census Bureau’s series on new single-family home sales, which are based on contracts or the acceptance of a deposit. Because of these differences, it is not uncommon for each series to move in different directions in the same month. In addition, existing-home sales, which generally account for 85 percent of total home sales, are based on a much larger sample – nearly 40 percent of multiple listing service data each month – and typically are not subject to large prior-month revisions.

(See note 2 below)
The only valid comparisons for median prices are with the same period a year earlier due to the seasonality in buying patterns. Month-to-month comparisons do not compensate for seasonal changes, especially for the timing of family buying patterns.

(See note 3 below)
Because there is a concentration of condos in high-cost metro areas, the national median condo price can be higher than the median single-family price. In a given market area, condos typically cost less than single-family homes.

Existing-home sales for November will be released December 28. The next Pending Home Sales Index will be on December 4 and the forecast will be revised December 11.



Visit my web site for additional services and support:
LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 27, 2006

Dining Out: That Place For Food

Seldom do you come across a local restaurant that when you look at the food preparation, presentation and proportions you realize that there is something special occurring. "That Place For Food" is such a place. In fact, local residents are also discovering it and letting others know. Below are some of the comments that have been appearing on a local nj.com forum... "

Wow. I ate at That Place that some of you guys have been talking about and I have got to say. It was Great! When I hear people talk about how good a restaurant is I get a little skeptical but this Place is off the charts for sure. The dining room is very nice and decorated very nice. The women that served our table was named Kathy, She is one of the owners children. She told us that her and her two brothers work there every week to help there mom and dad. Well Kathy who is very young gave our table the best service. The food was truly the best i've had. The seafood is very fresh, and delicious. I had the mussels marinara appitizer which was very good. I ordered the prime rib 20 ounce which was the best I have ever had. I was so full after the mussels and only finished 1/3 of my rib and took the rest of it home. The next day I was going to reheat for lunch and weighed it it was 20 ounces. Wow I ate 1/3 of it last nght and the nexed day I still had 20 ounces left. The portions are unbelievable. I asked the owner how he can do it and he said I will never short change a customer. I always give the customers more not less. Tell me a restaurant with that kind of thinking. They were covering a shrimp display tray for a catering customer that was beautiful. All I can say is You have got to try this place it's 5 star in my book."

"I've eaten there numerous time and never had a bad meal. It's a great place! The owners are so friendly...they make you feel like family." "They are closed Sunday and Mondays. It's run by a man and women with kids. It's a family run business. The last time I ate there I asked about the hours and they explained that they are at the market every morning at 5:00 AM Picking out the seafood. They close at eight or when they sell out. They make every thing fresh. It's really a great place. Last week I went and had The seafood combo It was Huge and delicious. My mom and dad had the Prime Rib which was delicious and tender. The only bad thing I can tell you is It's so good you cant stop eating.. there goes my diet again."

Here are some of the direct links to those and other forum comments:
http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7380
http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7299 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7307 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7289 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7278 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7215 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7199 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7188 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7164 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7141 http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7097http://www.nj.com/forums/deptford/index.ssf?searchart?artid=7004

That Place for Food is located at 1820 Delsea Drive, Depford Township, NJ. (Less than a mile from the Route 55 exit.) The main chef (and one of the business owners) is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America (
CIA). Prices are very reasonble. Dress is casual. They also do catering.

[Disclosure: The business owners are tenants in a client's property. However, I'm sharing this with you because I believe they deserve to be talked about. Check them out for yourself and see if you don't agree with everyone.]




Visit my web site for additional services and support:
LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).



Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, November 26, 2006

Medford Dickens Festival - Start The Holiday Season

The township of Medford celebrates it's annual Dickens Festival, this Friday, Dec. 1st (rain date Dec. 2nd) the official Medford start to the Holiday season! A tree lighting ceremony kicks off the festival. Sponsored by the Historic Medford Village Association, its held on Main Street (Rt. 541). It starts at 6pm and runs until 9:30pm.

This is a great evening out for couples, families and groups of friends. Lots of food, music, entertainment, historic walking tour, carriage rides and more.

Click here for more details.



Visit my web site for additional services and support:
LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 25, 2006

Eudora Will Soon Be Open Source from Mozilla (Firefox)

For those of you who use Qualcomm's, e-mail program, Eudora, this is to make you aware -- if you don't know already -- that it is in the process of being open sourced by Mozilla, the same organization that developed Firefox, and will be available for free, sometime in 2007. It is currently being readied by Mozilla and is called the "Penelope" Project internally. Until then, it will be supported on a limited basis by Qualcomm.

In the meantime, here are some links for more details and to keep informed:

Eudora Announcement FAQs

"Penelope" Project at Mozilla



Visit my web site for additional services and support: LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, November 24, 2006

New Jersey Parks and Outdoor Recreation

Besides the vast amount of undeveloped land that make up the New Jersey Pinelands, or Pine Barrens, and which include large parks such as Wharton State Forest, there are many other state, county and local parks that provide great outdoor and recreational enjoyment.

Here are some online resources to help you find out about those parks...
New Jersey Parks and Outdoor Recreation - Official NJ web site for information about parks and forests, hiking, boating, fishing, hunting and camping. (see also NJ DEP: Fish and Wildlife)

Recreation.gov - New Jersey - get a list of Recreation Areas within NJ or nationally.

The Parkday Organization - It's web site provides information on state, county and local parks. "It is designed to allow you, the user, to perform advanced and detailed searches of New Jersey parks, based on the criteria you choose. The Parkday education link is designed to allow teachers and nature lovers alike the ability to learn and better understand the natural world around them by exploring the outdoor classrooms that exist within New Jersey parks, forests and Wildlife Management areas." It has a comprehensive links page for everything relating to enjoying and maintaining New Jersey's outdoors.

Trails.com - NJ Outdoor Recreation - "New Jersey might not be the first place one thinks of for outdoor recreation, even for Garden state locals, but perhaps it should be...Clearly, New Jersey defies expectations, and perhaps is best thought of as a vast nature preserve between the two metropolitan regions of New York City and Philadelphia."



Visit my web site for additional services and support:
LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, November 23, 2006

Celebrate: Thanksgiving Day - Interesting Facts from Census Bureau - 2006

What many regard as the nation’s first Thanksgiving took place in December 1621 as the religious separatist Pilgrims held a three-day feast to celebrate a bountiful harvest.

The day did not become a national holiday until 1863 when, at the end of a long and bloody civil war, Abraham Lincoln asked all Americans to set aside the last Thursday in November as a day of thanksgiving.

Later, during the Great Depression in 1939, President Franklin Roosevelt proclaimed that Thanksgiving should be celebrated on the next to last Thursday of the month to encourage earlier holiday shopping, never on the occasional fifth Thursday. However, it was not mandatory and not all states complied.

Finally, Congress ruled that after 1941 the 4th Thursday in November would be a federal holiday proclaimed by the President each year. (Source: usinfo.state.gov, census.gov)


Click here for the Census Bureau's Thanksgiving 2006 Interesting Facts page



Visit my web site for additional resources and services: http://LawrenceYerkes.com

or visit http://BestHomes-NJ.com for the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (residential, commercial, multi-family, farm, land)

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, November 22, 2006

Commercial Real Estate Index Rises Again In Third Quarter

WASHINGTON, November 22, 2006 - The Commercial Leading Indicator (CLI) for Brokerage Activity,* a leading indicator for the commercial real estate market, has increased for six consecutive quarters showing that continued growth can be expected in commercial real estate sectors, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR).

In the third quarter, the Commercial Leading Indicator for Brokerage Activity rose 0.4 percent to a reading of 120.1 from an index of 119.6 in the second quarter, and is 2.9 percent higher than the third quarter of 2005 when it stood at 116.7.

David Lereah, NAR’s chief economist, said the index is at the highest level in the series of the indicator, which goes back to 1990. “Although we have a strong uptrend in the commercial sectors, the rise in the index over the last two quarters shows a lower rate of expansion in comparison with late 2005 and early 2006,” Lereah said. “This means that commercial sectors will continue to grow, but at a more modest pace.”

Growth in the index means net absorption of space in the industrial and office sectors will continue to improve over the next six to nine months, with rising completions of overall retail, office, warehouse and lodging structures.

The
commercial leading indicator is a tool to assess market behavior in the major commercial real estate sectors. The index incorporates 13 variables that reflect future commercial real estate activity, weighted appropriately to produce a single indicator of future market performance, and is designed to provide early signals of turning points between expansions and slowdowns in commercial real estate.

Net absorption in the office and industrial sectors in the first quarter of 2007 is expected to be 70 million to 90 million square feet, with about $315 billion to $325 billion in new, completed commercial construction activity, compared with $309 billion of new construction recorded in the third quarter.

Commercial real estate practitioners can anticipate leasing and sales activity in the first quarter to be approximately 2.9 percent higher than the first quarter of 2006.

The 13 series in the index include industrial production, the REIT (real estate investment trust) price index, NCREIF (National Council of Real Estate Investment Fiduciaries) total return, personal income minus transfer payments, jobs in financial activities, jobs in professional business service, jobs in temporary help, jobs in retail trade, jobs in wholesale trade, initial claims for unemployment insurance, manufacturers’ durable goods shipment, wholesale merchant sales, and retail sales and food service.

More than 100,000 NAR members offer some level of commercial service, with 60,000 specializing primarily in the commercial real estate market.
The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

# # #

* NAR reviewed a wide variety of indicators, examined the relationships of indicators that demonstrated a historical impact on commercial real estate, and modeled a forward looking index based on historic trends. Although individual indicators sometimes move in opposite directions, together they offer a better indication of future market activity.

Quarterly data for 13 selected series were reviewed back through the first quarter of 1990. The modeling demonstrated a change in commercial brokerage activity that could be seen two quarters later as measured by net absorption in the industrial and office sectors, and the value of building construction put-in-place on completion of retail, office, warehouse and lodging structures. An index of 100 is defined as the level of commercial real estate market activity during the first quarter of 1990, the first period to be analyzed.

The next commercial real estate market forecast is scheduled for release on December 14, and the next commercial indicator index will be released February 22




Visit my web site for additional services and support: LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

DOE: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Growth Lower Than Average in 2005

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASHINGTON DC

Total U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were 7,147.2 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2005, an increase of 0.6 percent from the 2004 level according to Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2005, a report released today by the Energy Information Administration (
EIA). Since 1990, GHG emissions have grown at an average annual rate of 1.0 percent.

U.S. GHG emissions per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or “U.S. GHG-intensity,” fell from 664 metric tons per million 2000 constant dollars of GDP (MTCO2e/$Million GDP) in 2004 to 647 MTCO2e /$Million GDP in 2005, a decline of 2.5 percent. Since 1990, the annual average decline in GHG-intensity has been 1.9 percent.

Total estimated U.S. GHG emissions in 2005 consisted of 6,008.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (84.1 percent of total emissions), 611.9 MMTCO2e of methane (8.6 percent of total emissions), 366.6 MMTCO2e of nitrous oxide (5.1 percent of total emissions), and 160.2 MMTCO2e of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) (2.2 percent of total emissions).

The 2005 emissions increase is well below the rate of economic growth of 3.2 percent and below the average annual growth rate of 1.0 percent in greenhouse gas emissions since 1990. Emissions of carbon dioxide from energy consumption and industrial processes, which have risen at an average annual rate of 1.2 percent per year since 1990, grew by only 0.3 percent in 2005. Slow growth in carbon dioxide emissions from 2004 to 2005 can be attributed mainly to higher energy prices that suppressed energy demand, low or negative growth in several energy-intensive industries, and weather-related disruptions in the energy infrastructure along the Gulf Coast that shut down both petroleum and natural gas operations. Emissions of methane increased by 0.9 percent, while emissions of nitrous oxide rose by 1.9 percent. Emissions of HFCs, PFCs, and SF6, a group labeled collectively as “high-GWP gases” because their high heat trapping capabilities, rose by 7.2 percent.

The full report can be found on EIA's web site at:
http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/1605/ggrpt/index.html



Visit my web site for additional services and support:
LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

Frontpage To Become Expression Web (Designer)

Frontpage Is No Longer Part of Office

Frontpage will no longer be part of the Office suite of applications and has been replaced. It's replacement, Expression Web, is now part of the Microsoft Expression product group -- together with Expression Graphic (for graphic design) and Expression Interactive (for app design) -- of web site development applications:

Expression Web was designed to create code based on CSS and XML. It is the new replacement for Frontpage. It features an enhanced interface, XML and XSLT support, and improved, efficient Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) support. (While it is currently known as "Expression Web", it was previously called "Expresssion Web Designer" and you will still see references using it's previous name.)

See also:
PC Magazine - Microsoft Expression,
Wikipedia - XSLT,
Wikipedia - CSS
CSS Tutorial
History of Frontpage



Visit my web site for additional services and support:
LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 20, 2006

Market Transition Confirmed by 3rd-Quarter Metro Home Prices and State Sales

WASHINGTON, November 20, 2006 - Conditions for home buyers improved during the third quarter as existing single-family home prices in many metropolitan areas experienced corrections, and most states saw sales activity below a year ago which helped to build housing inventories, according to the latest quarterly surveys by the National Association of Realtors (NAR).

Total state existing-home sales, including single-family and condo, were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate (1) of 6.27 million units in the third quarter, down 12.7 percent from a 7.18 million-unit pace in the third quarter of 2005 – the second highest level on record, after a peak of 7.19 million in the second quarter of last year. Even with the overall decline, 10 states showed increases in sales activity from a year ago.

Third-quarter metro area single-family home prices, examining changes in 148 metropolitan statistical areas, (2) show 102 areas had price gains, including 21 metros with double-digit annual increases, and 45 areas experiencing price declines; one was unchanged.

David Lereah, NAR’s chief economist, said market conditions are nearly the opposite of a year ago. “Last year we had a record sales market and historically tight supplies of homes with buyers bidding over the asking price,” he said. “With the market in full transition, buyers now have choices and sellers are more willing to negotiate – under these circumstances it’s no surprise that overall home prices are slightly below a year ago. We expect this trend to continue in the months ahead, but we’ll see modest appreciation in most of the country in 2007.”

The national median existing single-family home price was $224,900 in the third quarter, down 1.2 percent from a year earlier when the median price was $227,600. The median is a typical market price where half of the homes sold for more and half sold for less.

NAR President
Pat Vredevoogd Combs, of Grand Rapids, Mich., and vice president of Coldwell Banker-AJS-Schmidt, said the market transition is good news for home buyers. “With the supply of homes at the highest level in over a decade and historically low mortgage interest rates, it’s become a great time to buy a home,” said Combs. “This window of opportunity will continue into the new year, but inventories are starting to decline and sellers will be less willing to negotiate when conditions begin to balance in most areas around early spring.”

According to Freddie Mac, the national average commitment rate on a 30-year conventional fixed-rate mortgage was 6.56 percent in the third quarter, down from 6.60 percent in the second quarter; the rate was 5.76 percent in the third quarter of 2005. Last week, Freddie Mac reported the 30-year fixed rate was down to 6.24 percent.

The biggest total sales increase was in North Carolina, where existing-home sales rose 9.7 percent from the third quarter of 2005. In Texas the third-quarter resale pace rose 8.6 percent from a year earlier, while Montana experienced the third strongest gain, up 6.4 percent.

The largest single-family home price increase was in the Salem, Ore., area, where the third quarter price of $228,000 was 24.7 percent higher than a year ago. Next was Elmira, N.Y., at $93,600, up 21.4 percent from the third quarter of 2005. The Salt Lake City area, with a third quarter median price of $216,300, increased 19.2 percent in the last year.

Median third-quarter metro area single-family prices ranged from a very affordable $86,000 in both Decatur, Ill., and the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman area of Ohio and Pennsylvania, to nearly nine times that amount in the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont area where the median price was $749,400. The second most expensive area was the San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara area of California, at $747,400, followed by the Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine area (Orange Co., Calif.), at $705,000.

In addition to Elmira, N.Y., other affordable markets include South Bend-Mishawaka, Ind., with a third-quarter median price of $96,000, and the Cumberland area of Maryland and West Virginia at $100,900.

In the condo sector,
metro area condominium and cooperative prices – covering changes in 57 markets – show the national median existing condo price was $222,900 in the third quarter, down 2.1 percent from the same period in 2005. Thirty-one metros showed annual increases in the median condo price, including eight areas with double-digit gains; 27 metros had price declines.

The strongest condo price gains were in the Knoxville, Tenn., area, where the third quarter price of $155,700 rose 29.0 percent from a year ago. In Wichita, Kan., the median condo price of $130,300 rose 25.5 percent from the third quarter of 2005, while Albuquerque, N.M., at $153,300, increased 21.0 percent.

Metro area median existing condo prices in the third quarter ranged from $108,200 in Rochester, N.Y., to $600,600 in the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont area. The second most expensive reported condo market was Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, at $384,500, followed by the San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos area of California at $361,100.
Other affordable condo markets include Bismarck, N.D., at $109,000, and Greensboro-High Point, N.C., at $113,000.

Regionally, the Northeast saw an existing-home sales pace of 1.05 million units in the third quarter, which was 12.5 percent below a year ago. The median Northeastern resale single-family home price was $276,000 in the third quarter, which is 4.8 percent below the same period in 2005.

After Elmira, N.Y., the strongest price increase in the Northeast was in Atlantic City, N.J., with a median price of $277,200, up 12.0 percent from the third quarter of last year, followed by Binghamton, N.Y., with a median price of $107,400, up 10.0 percent.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
# # #
(1) The seasonally adjusted annual rate for a particular quarter represents what the total number of actual sales for a year would be if the relative sales pace for that quarter was maintained for four consecutive quarters. Total home sales include single family, townhomes, condominiums and co-operative housing. NAR began tracking the state sales series in 1981.
Seasonally adjusted rates are used in reporting quarterly data to factor out seasonal variations in resale activity. For example, sales volume normally is higher in the summer and relatively light in winter, primarily because of differences in the weather and household buying patterns.
Tables of state resale rates, percent changes and some historic data are available at the site below under Research – click on Housing Statistics, then scroll down the center to State Existing-Home Sales.
(2) Areas are generally metropolitan statistical areas as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. A list of counties included in MSA definitions is available at:
http://www.census.gov/population/estimates/metro-city/0312msa.txt
Regional median home prices include rural areas and samples of many smaller metros that are not included in this report; the regional percentage changes do not necessarily parallel changes in the larger metro areas. The only valid comparisons for median prices are with the same period a year earlier due to seasonality in buying patterns. Quarter-to-quarter comparisons do not compensate for seasonal changes, especially for the timing of family buying patterns.
NAR began publication of metropolitan area median single-family home prices in 1982; the metro area condo price series was launched at the beginning of 2006.
Because there is a concentration of condos in high-cost metro areas, the national median condo price sometimes is higher than the median single-family price. In a given market area, condos typically cost less than single-family homes. As the reporting sample expands in the future, additional area will be included in the condo price report.
Tables of metropolitan area median prices, percent changes and some historic data are available at
http://www.realtor.org – under Research click on Housing Statistics, then scroll down the center to Metropolitan Area Prices.



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Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

NJ Property Tax Reform Proposals

On November 15, 2006, the four bipartisan, bicameral committees that were established on July 28, 2006 each submitted a report to the New Jersey Legislature containing proposals for legislation and constitutional amendments for property tax reform. NJAR is reviewing the reports to determine their specific impact on New Jersey’s private property owners.

Click here to view each committee’s report as well view as an Executive Summary



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Sunday, November 19, 2006

Loaning Money To People You Know - Guidelines

How to Hassle the Pal Who Owes You.

Lend money to a friend and you might lose both, the old saying says. Here are the guidelines for making sure there are no misunderstandings.
(Source: Bankrate.com/MSN)

Money trouble is not only the primary cause of divorce in America. Friendships and families often break up when a borrower fails to pay back a personal loan...

Full Story



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Saturday, November 18, 2006

Rapid Relocations: What To Do With Your Old House?

Short-notice relocations are not uncommon, particularly in the world of business. In addition to the weighty tasks of organizing the move, making family arrangements, and settling into a new community, homeowners have the added dilemma of what to do with their current home? The question boils down to one of two choices: put the home on the market for immediate sale, or keep the property as rental/investment property.

Deciding whether or not to sell your home during relocation is more of a puzzle than ever before. The appreciation of home values, while not holding at the bristling pace of previous years, is still alluring in most areas. Flexible lending options can reduce the pressure also to sell.

Reasons for hesitation

For some homeowners caught up in a sudden relocation, the prospect of a hurried home sale is unappealing. Many aren't willing to add stress and complexity at a time when there are already so many things to be taken care of. Others are reluctant to sell right away in markets that show continued appreciation, worried that they will be missing out on even bigger returns.

Should you stay or should you go?

Before you dwell on the possibility of renting your home rather than selling, you must first determine if doing so is even financially viable. Because you're considering holding on to the house for its investment potential, you need to asses the quality of that investment.

What are the rental prospects for your home? - What are area landlords charging in rent for homes of comparable size and quality? Have rents fluctuated greatly over the last 2-3 years, or have they remained stable? Will any foreseeable local factors (such as nearby universities or large employers moving in/out) affect the supply of tenants? Getting an accurate read on the local renting market is essential.

What are your anticipated expenses as a landlord? - If you are moving out of the area, you will likely need a property management company to handle the day to day aspects of the rental. Such companies usually charge 10 to 20% of the monthly rent for their services, although rates vary from market to market. Don't forget to account for the cost of basic maintenance and improvement to the property.

What are your current home expenses? - How much are your mortgage payments, monthly property taxes and maintenance expenses?

What are your new housing expenses? - Costs associated with your new home can affect your ability to be flexible with the old. If renting a new home, what is your monthly rent? If buying, what are your monthly mortgage payments, and how much financial flexibility do you have to meet a down payment and closing costs?

What is the home's resale outlook? - How much value has your home gained in your time as its owner? Are home prices on a steady rise, or are prices leveling off, or even dropping? Form a realistic (in other words, conservative) estimate of your home's value in 2-3 years based on hard market data.

With answers to these five questions, you can start to sort things out. If home appreciation in your area is leveling off or showing signs of a downward turn, holding onto the property as an investment probably doesn't make a lot of sense in the first place.

In cases where favorable appreciation seems likely, next examine the potential revenue vs. cost of the rental investment. If the projected monthly revenue you will receive from rent will generate a profit, the rental is likely a good investment. Even if the rental profits are modest or just enough to cover expenses, the appreciation of the home's overall value is reason to hold off on an immediate sale.

In cases where the value of the home is appreciating rapidly, keeping the home as a rental property may still make sense even if it means operating at a loss. If the housing market appreciates at a fast rate and you can sell the home at a significant profit, it makes economic sense.

Tax Questions

The tax benefits of selling the home versus renting out the property are not exactly cut and dry. When selling a primary residence in which homeowners have lived for at least two of the last five years, couples filing jointly can exclude up to $500,000 of the profit from capital-gains taxes (the figure is $250,000 for individuals filing singly). This sizable tax advantage is something most homeowners want to protect, and many who do decide to rent will sell after a three year period to meet the minimum requirements of the capital gains exclusion.


While the costs of improving and maintaining a rental property are tax-deductible, the profits from the sale of a rental property are generally taxed at the current long term capital gain rate of 15%. This tax bill can be deferred, however, if you sell the home and use the proceeds to purchase a similar investment property (known as a like-kind exchange under Sec. 1031 of the tax code).

Keeping it all Together

Aside from monetary concerns, the stresses of selling vs. renting the home should be considered. Renting out a property from afar can be a trying experience for some. So-called "absentee landlords" may have to deal with problem tenants, emergency repairs and changing rental markets. On the other hand, selling a home on short notice can come with its own brand of anxiety.


The article is taken from one of our recent Newsletters that was e-mailed to all registered subscribers,
via our RE/MAX of New Jersey web site



Visit my web site for additional resources and services: www.LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit
BestHomes-NJ.com for the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (residential, commercial, multi-family, farm, land)


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, November 17, 2006

Suggesting stabilizing conditions in the nation's single-family housing market, home builder confidence in November edged up for the second consecutive month, according to the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI). The HMI gained two points from the previous month to stand at 33. "More and more builders are seeing light at the end of the tunnel," said NAHB President David Pressly, a home builder from Statesville, N.C. "Our members are telling us that the market is steadying after a significant downward correction. On the demand side, we look for sales to stabilize and gradually move up in the coming months." (Source: NAHB)

Full Story . . .



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Consumers Still Confident In Home Values

Americans remain highly confident about the nation's housing prospects, with more than four out of five home owners expecting the value of their home to appreciate over the next five years and nearly seven out of 10 calling it their most valuable investment, according to results from a new nationwide survey. "The poll clearly debunks the more sensational media reports speculating on the demise of the housing market," said David Pressly, president of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and a home builder from Statesville, N.C. "It is interesting to note that other polls conducted by major news organizations have come up with similar results, indicating that despite the current housing market downturn Americans resoundingly believe that buying a home is the best investment they can ever make." (Source: NAHB)

Full Story . . .



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Thursday, November 16, 2006

New Jersey Market Reports and Statistics

For recent real estate market reporting for New Jersey by county and some townships, check out:
The Otteau Report.


Note: You can also get access to articles reporting national and regional market trend reports and statistics by clicking on the corresponding tag labels (below) for this article.




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Wednesday, November 15, 2006

What's Old is New: Using Reclaimed Wood Inside Modern Homes

In a society fascinated with everything "retro", homeowners have found an unlikely obsession: historic timber. In what is a growing trend, homeowners are now using vintage wood planks and beams in flooring, walls, cabinetry, shelving, support structures and interior accents.

What is "Reclaimed" Wood?

"Reclaimed" wood is a term used by architects and interior designers to describe wood that has been pulled from older buildings and re-milled for use in the interiors and exteriors of modern structures. Salvage companies search for serviceable wood planks, boards and beams from places such as old barns, turn-of-the-century factories and unused railroad trestles. Damaged and decayed wood is separated from those pieces that are suitable for reclamation.

Promising pieces must be carefully scanned for nails and spikes that need to be removed. Before being re-milled the wood is often air or kiln dried to remove moisture from within the wood.

Depending on the wishes of the homeowner, the wood may be bleached or re-stained after it emerges from the mill. In some cases the wood is then distressed once again, as re-cutting the wood can sometimes leave it with a "newer" appearance.

Why Reclaimed wood?

"Character" - For most, one the reasons reclaimed wood is appealing are the unique scars and scratches that years of use or exposure to the elements have worn into the wood. This "distressed" look can be applied to new wood as well (using a variety of techniques).

Authenticity - Using antique woods can lend a sense of authenticity to an interior, particularly when a home is designed to have a sort of "Vintage Chic" style. Vintage wood in flooring, walls and support beams can be especially effective when remodeling or adding on to an older home.

Wide Range of woods/styles - Reclaimed wood can include, elm, chestnut, hemlock, walnut, hickory-pecan, redwood, white pine, Douglas fir, and white oak. Prices vary according to the species.

Rare woods - The wood that suppliers find in most cases was originally milled in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when the timber industry had free range over the nation's forests. As a result, many of the wood types available via reclamation now grow only in protected forests and are no longer available through new timber channels. Many of these are stunning old-growth woods with beautiful aesthetic appeal.

Why Not?

Cost - Style like this doesn't come cheap. Recycled wood flooring averages roughly $13 to $24 per square foot installed depending on the variety of wood used. High quality new woods ring in somewhere in the $8 to $15 range. For reclaimed woods of especially unique origin, the price per square foot can be much higher.

Durability - Older woods typically don't have a protective coating of polyurethane, which can leave them susceptible to later dents or stains. In some cases, bugs living within the wood can survive the treating and re-milling process.

The reclaimed wood industry has grown in recent years to meet increasing demand. Designers and floor specialists are now more likely than ever to offer vintage wood options for use in flooring, cabinetry and interior walls. In addition, more and more homeowners are choosing distressed new wood or faux-vintage laminates wood for the interior spaces of their homes. While not for everyone, the imperfections and quirks of distressed wood interiors can lend a sense of old warmth and comfort to your home.


The article is taken from one of our recent Newsletters that was e-mailed to all registered subscribers,
via our RE/MAX of New Jersey web site



Visit my web site for additional resources and services: www.LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit
BestHomes-NJ.com for the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (residential, commercial, multi-family, farm, land)


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

Miles Per House -- The Next Thing?

ULI Experts Discuss Impact of Transportation Costs on Location Decisions; Look at Future Infrastructure Financing

WASHINGTON - The cost of energy likely will play a more important role in home buying decisions, with "house miles" (the number of miles a home is from employment, retail, education and entertainment) becoming a deal breaker or maker, according to land use industry experts at Urban Land Institute's (
ULI’s) recent annual fall meeting in Denver. (Source: ULI)

Click here for full story...



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Reinventing Space - Building Smaller, Smarter Homes

Even as the average size of American homes continues to climb, a movement favoring attention to detail and room design over total space is gaining momentum. This architectural counter-culture is based on the idea that bigger homes often do not suit the lifestyles of their inhabitants.

In 2005, the average home size reached an all time high of 2,434 square (based on figures from National Association of Home Builders and the Census Bureau). By comparison, the average home size thirty years ago was only 1,645 square feet. At the same time, family sizes are slowly decreasing. As of the 2000 Census, the average persons per American household was 2.59, down from 2.63 persons per household in the 1990 Census. Many homeowners, architects and builders feel strongly that the smaller, well-organized homes are more practical and more enjoyable.

Techniques emphasized in scaled down design include use of partial walls and glass for room separation, emphasis of vertical space and small touches such as in-hall cabinetry.

Proponents of smaller homes enjoy lower energy bills, cleaning costs and property taxes. Building within a smaller overall footprint also frees the owner or buyer to live in neighborhoods where space is at a premium. The ability to design a comfortable home in a condensed district with close access to work, shopping and entertainment is an incredible advantage.

At the forefront of this movement is Susan Susanka, whose "Not So Big House" books and lecture series place an emphasis on smaller floor plans, spatial organization and high-quality materials. Susanka's philosophy is that homeowners should build homes that are 1/3 smaller than what they think they need, but spend roughly the same budget over the smaller space. Spending more per square foot enables the homeowner to add custom details such as tiered arches or cozy window seats.

While the small-scale movement is growing in popularity and the growth of home sizes may be gradually slowing (2005's average was only 85 sq. feet larger than the same figure for 2004), there is no doubt that the majority of Americans still follow the theory that bigger is better. To most homeowners, two-car garages, wide-open rooms and long hallways remain more appealing more than cozy interiors with carefully crafted details. For some, however, thinking smaller will be the key to a happy home.


The article is taken from one of our recent Newsletters that was e-mailed to all registered subscribers,
via our RE/MAX of New Jersey web site



Visit my web site for additional resources and services:
www.LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit
BestHomes-NJ.com for the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (residential, commercial, multi-family, farm, land)


Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 13, 2006

Selling Your Home During the Holiday Season

Winter may be the most wonderful time of the year, but the holiday months can be anything but miraculous for sellers with property on the market. Traditionally the real estate world slows down significantly from early November through the beginning of January, and often sellers are the ones left in the lurch.

Winter Sellers: Disadvantages

Bad weather: Potential homebuyers are only human, so naturally winter's stormier conditions can convince many consumers to stay indoors.

Shorter days: Most buyers prefer to view homes in the full light of day, even when casually looking at houses and neighborhoods by car. With fewer daylight hours in the winter, homebuyers are usually limited to weekends for in-person showings.

Busy schedules: Time is at an absolute premium during a season of shopping for presents, attending holiday parties and traveling to visit relatives. Most people don't feel they can spare time during these months to shop for homes or plan the move to a new home.

Winter Sellers: Advantages

Smaller Housing Inventory: Because the holidays are a traditionally slower selling season and sellers are just as busy as buyers at this time of year, few homes are put on the market towards the end of the year. In addition, many previously listed properties are taken off the market as a temporary measure. While the number of active buyers is lower during the winter, sellers also face less competition.

Serious Buyers: People who are willing to rearrange their holiday schedule and brave the elements to shop for a home in general tend to be motivated, serious buyers. In many cases buyers at this time of year are invigorated by the promise of impending year-end bonuses. The demands of the season in large part also eliminate false alarms from casual buyers who are "just looking".

Tips

Target Those Rare Winter Buyers: When buyers are harder to come by, you have to work harder to attract their attention and do more to meet their needs:

* Make sure your home is well marketed on the Internet with plenty of photos and virtual tours, as buyers will spend more time browsing properties from the comfort of their own home.

* Hold open houses on weekends whenever possible. Consider an evening open house event, providing coffee and light fare to those who attend.

* Be flexible with your scheduling and requirements for showing the home to interested buyers

Improve Visibility: Make sure your home is well lit in the evenings and is not obscured by low hanging branches or foliage.

Update your Comparative Market Analysis: Even if you've previously obtained a market analysis, you may want updated information that factors in the seasonal slowing of real estate sales.

Presentation: Because it is holiday season, homebuyers may look at your home and try to imagine it as the setting for their own holiday celebrations. Make sure your home is warm and inviting without going overboard (no need to buy the biggest tree and the most lavish decorations available).

Lower the Price: No one wants to think that they've overvalued their home, but a price adjustment may be necessary if selling your home promptly is one of your goals.


The article is taken from one of our recent Newsletters that was e-mailed to all registered subscribers,
via our RE/MAX of New Jersey web site



Visit my web site for additional resources and services: www.LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit
BestHomes-NJ.com for the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (residential, commercial, multi-family, farm, land)



Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, November 12, 2006

Cost Segregation - Benefits The Real Estate Investor

"Cost segregation is a lucrative tax strategy that should be used in almost every major purchase of commercial real estate."- Wall Street Journal

Cost Segregation is an important tax strategy that EVERY real estate owner/investor should throughly understand because of the dramatic tax impacts it can provide. Below are some resources to help you get a better handle on the strategy...


Cost Segregation: Why are 90% of Real Estate Investors Overpaying Federal Income Taxes?

AICPA - Cost Segregation Applied - CPA guidelines for how to use, pros/cons and when/when not to use. "A taxpayer can substantially increase cash flow by segregating property costs...Cost Segregations can provide Real Estate purchasers with tremendous tax benefits from accelerated depreciation deductions and easier write-offs when an asset becomes obsolete, broken or destroyed."

SVA - Getting The Facts About Cost Segregation (PDF) - brief introduction.

CPA Journal (NYSSCPA) - Real Estate Investors Can Benefit for Cost Segregation Studies (CSS) -"CSSs are an IRS-sanctioned technique that allow businesses to accelerate depreciation on their facilities. Although the IRS does not prescribe one specific methodology, the IRS’s Cost Segregation Audit Technique Guide enumerates several methods and considers the detailed engineering approach from actual cost records as “the most methodical and accurate approach.” This approach consists of carefully examining all contemporaneous construction and accounting records. Estimates or “take-offs” are used to supplement the actual cost detail when the existing detail is not sufficient for the study. A professional consultancy comprised of architects, engineers, and accountants with prior cost-segregation experience is required to perform this kind of cost segregation study."

IRS's Cost Segregation Audit Guidelines - the official IRS guidelines.



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Lawn Care Tips

Winter might be on its way, but here's a link to save for spring...

"Few things in the home landscape generate as much pride as a healthy lawn and for some, it can generate fear and loathing. Having a lush green turf can be challenging, but true lawn American Lawn lovers enjoy the small tasks required for a great looking lawn. For those that fear the challenge, it most likely is because they don't understand the basic principles involved in maintaining a healthy lawn." (Source: American -Lawns.com)

Lawn tips . . .



Visit my web site for additional services and support: http://www.LawrenceYerkes.com

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Saturday, November 11, 2006

Celebrate: Veterans Day

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 to change the name to Veterans Day as a way to honor those who served in all American wars. The day has evolved into also honoring living military veterans with parades and speeches across the nation. A national ceremony takes place at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. (Source: Census Bureau)

Here are links that go into more detail about veterans day:

Census Bureau - Facts For Features: Veterans Day - Interesting statics related to veterans.


Veterans Administraton - Proclamations, Celebrations, FAQ, Educational resources and more.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools: Veterans Day - History and Meaning

InfoPlease - Veterans Day - Veterans' statistics, history of the holiday, war poetry, and more

NOBLE Web: Veterans Day - A collection of Veteran's Day links from NOBLE: the North of Boston Library Exchange.

Veteran's Day Resource Guide - links to Veterans Day and veteransorganizations celebrating Veterans Day

Kid's Domain - Salute to Veterans

U.S. Army's History of Veterans Day

Wikipedia - Veterans Day



Visit my web site for additional services and support:
http://www.LawrenceYerkes.com

and visit Besthomes-NJ.com to find the latest New Jersey Real Estate property listings (Residential, Commercial, Multi-Family, Farm, Land).

Copyright 2006 by Timon, Inc. All Rights Reserved.